Psychosis

Irreverence Group Music presents: Psychosis, the third solo album of composer Julián De La Chica. Inspired by his last trip to Berlin, Krakow and Warsaw, De la chica immerses in electronic experimentation and influences ranging from ambient and post-minimal, to genres such as acid, industrial and minimal electronic. An album composed and produced by De La Chica in his home studio in Brooklyn, NY, whose music explores the virtual Pychosis of our times.

For Aniela

During the Summer, Composer Julián De La Chica visited Auschwitz for the first time. During his visit, he found himself drawn to the photo of a woman prisoner, Aniela. He composed this piece in her honor on his way back to Krakow. The photo on the cover is hers, taken by De La Chica himself. "Dear Aniela, there are not words, but there is music..."

A woman of no importance (Cybernetics Oratorium)

An elderly woman who decides to burn all of her possessions (i.e., her memories) and to start all over. A girl who is kidnapped and murdered. A cyborg or robot who is subject to sexual and domestic slavery, becomes aware of herself and then rebels through pain as her weapon for freedom. These are the three main characters of this oratorium, which concludes with a requiem in memory of composer Pauline Oliveros (1932-2016).

Lisa Moore - De La Chica, Preludes Op. 8

Described as “brilliant and searching… beautiful and impassioned… lustrous at the keyboard” by The New York Times and crowned “New York’s queen of avant-garde piano” and “visionary” by The New Yorker, the celebrated pianist Lisa Moore releases a her album DE LA CHICA: PRELUDES OP. 8 on March 1st 2018. The album - produced and published by independent record label Irreverence Group Music - is the Premiere Recording of the New York based Colombian composer Julián De La Chica's Preludes Op. 8 for piano and synthesizer.

Präludium (Harpsichord Version)

Produced by Irreverence Group Music, this Special edition contains an alternative recording of the Cycle Op. 9's first song, Präludium (Aufruf), in which Soprano Rachel Hippert collaborates with Costa Rican harpsichord player María Clara Vargas Cullell. This recording is available as a bonus track for the physical album's second release, and in iTunes will be available on September 6, 2017. The iTunes release includes new cover Artwork, Silent Witnesses by Colombian-born American painter Jorge Posada.

Suicidio en Guayas (Live Recoring)

An elderly woman who decides to burn all of her possessions (i.e., her memories) and to start all over. A girl who is kidnapped and murdered. A cyborg or robot who is subject to sexual and domestic slavery, becomes aware of herself and then rebels through pain as her weapon for freedom. These are the three main characters of this oratorium, which concludes with a requiem in memory of composer Pauline Oliveros (1932-2016).

Tribute to Pauline Oliveros

On September 13, 1970, a young composer named Pauline Oliveros (1932-2016) published in The New York Times an article entitled "And Don't Call Them 'Lady' Composers", Ms. Oliveros addressed an unasked yet (tellingly so) critical question: “Why have there been no ‘great’ women composers?” Her argument is guided by a questioning of critical, historiographic and technical discourse. Oliveros explained how the cult of innovation constructs figures of "greatness," and to what extent society promotes the virilization of these discursive models.

She Knows (Live at Na Bolom)

I assume minimalism as an asceticism. The Mexican duo ChaTo (Julio Torres and Pablo Chavarría) is characterized by choosing not to seek an extratemporal transendence in their live performances. For them, the instant is the only thing that exists: like a mandala, it is built to later be erased. Between the three of us, what we make is and is erased in improvisation; in its becoming, it is resonance and its fragility. As a trio, we base our work on this break. But, “what is it that is broken? What is that precious object that we want to preserve?” Torres asks. “The process of reaching the breaking point, an emptiness, like a cinematographic suicide in each work”, Chavarría responds.

Experimentelle und unbestimmte Lieder Op. 9

We live in a world where silence has been lost. We live in the constant search for social acceptance, and our universe revolves around social networks. "How can we talk about what is happening today in the world, if we do not know what is happening within us?" We do not know our hearts, natures, and potential, and most of us are too afraid to confront our true selves. This work: Experiential and Indeterminate Songs, Op. 9 (Experimentelle und unbestimmte Lieder Op. 9) is a call to silence, to the exploration of our inner processes, and to the search for fullness.